Whipworm

Trichuris trichiura or Trichocephalus trichiuris), is a roundworm, which causes trichuriasis when it infects a human large intestine. The name whipworm refers to the shape of the worm; they look like whips with wider “handles” at the posterior end.

Infection occurs through accidental ingestion of eggs (which are usually found in dry goods such as beans, rice, and various grains) and is more common in warmer areas. The eggs hatch in the small intestine, and then move into the wall of the small intestine and develop. On reaching adulthood, the thinner end (the front of the worm) burrows into the large intestine and the thicker end hangs into the lumen and mates with nearby worms. The females can grow to 50 mm (2 inches) long. Neither the male nor the female has much of a visible tail past the anus.

Whipworm infestation is detectable by stool examination, which can detect eggs and charcot-leyden crystals. Mebendazole is 90% effective in the first dose, and albendazole may also be offered as an anti-parasitic agent. Adding iron to the bloodstream helps solve the iron deficiency and rectal prolapse.

Whipworm commonly infects patients also infected with Giardia, Entamoeba histolytica, Ascaris lumbricoides, and hookworms.

Infection can be avoided by proper disposal of human feces, not eating dirt, and not eating crops fertilized with night soil.

one of the original names i had picked out for myself to record under
but decided against
due to its somewhat subtle sado-masochistic undertones and obviously the poop.